Load testing Choria

09/19/2017

Overview


Many of you probably know I am working on a project called Choria that modernize MCollective which will eventually supersede MCollective (more on this later).

Given that Choria is heading down a path of being a rewrite in Go I am also taking the opportunity to look into much larger scale problems to meet some client needs.

In this and the following posts I’ll write about work I am doing to load test and validate Choria to 100s of thousands of nodes and what tooling I created to do that.

Middleware


Choria builds around the NATS middleware which is a Go based middleware server that forgoes a lot of the persistence and other expensive features – instead it focusses on being a fire and forget middleware network. It has an additional project should you need those features so you can mix and match quite easily.

Turns out that’s exactly what typical MCollective needs as it never really used the persistence features and those just made the associated middleware quite heavy.

To give you an idea, in the old days the community would suggest every ~ 1000 nodes managed by MCollective required a single ActiveMQ instance. Want 5 500 MCollective nodes? That’ll be 6 machines – physical recommended – and 24 to 30 GB RAM in a cluster just to run the middleware. We’ve had reports of much larger RabbitMQ networks on 4 or 5 servers – 50 000 managed nodes or more, but those would be big machines and they had quite a lot of performance issues.

There was a time where 5 500 nodes was A LOT but now it’s becoming a bit every day, so I need to focus upward.

With NATS+Choria I am happily running 5 500 nodes on a single 2 CPU VM with 4GB RAM. In fact on a slightly bigger VM I am happily running 50 000 nodes on a single VM and NATS uses around 1GB to 1.5GB of RAM at peak.

Doing 100s of RPC requests in a row against 50 000 nodes the response time is pretty solid around 16 seconds for a RPC call to every node, it’s stable, never drops a message and the performance stays level in the absence of Java GC issues. This is fast but also quite slow – the Ruby client manages about 300 replies every 0.10 seconds due to the amount of protocol decoding etc that is needed.

This brings with it a whole new level of problem. Just how far can we take the client code and how do you determine when it’s too big and how do I know the client, broker and federation I am working on significantly improve things.

I’ve also significantly reworked the network protocol to support Federation but the shipped code optimize for code and config simplicity over lets say support for 20 000 Federation Collectives. When we are talking about truly gigantic Choria networks I need to be able to test scenarios involving 10s of thousands of Federated Network all with 10s of thousands of nodes in them. So I need tooling that lets me do this.

Getting to running 50 000 nodes


Not everyone just happen to have a 50 000 node network lying about they can play with so I had to improvise a bit.

As part of the rewrite I am doing I am building a Go framework with the Choria protocol, config parsing and network handling all built in Go. Unlike the Ruby code I can instantiate multiple of these in memory and run them in Go routines.

This means I could write a emulator that can start a number of faked Choria daemons all in one process. They each have their own middleware connection, run a varying amount of agents with a varying amount of sub collectives and generally behave like a normal MCollective machine. On my MacBook I can run 1 500 Choria instances quite easily.

So with fewer than 60 machines I can emulate 50 000 MCollective nodes on a 3 node NATS cluster and have plenty of spare capacity. This is well within budget to run on AWS and not uncommon these days to have that many dev machines around.

In the following posts I’ll cover bits about the emulator, what I look for when determining optimal network sizes and how to use the emulator to test and validate performance of different network topologies.

Follow-up Posts